Hitting someone, throwing a ball hard at someone's head, spitting at someone: these are all examples of harmful acts, called 'battery' in Tort Law, and most of us judge those who do such things without the victim's implied or actual consent as morally blameworthy. Could widespread aversion towards such acts be due to some kind of fundamental moral principle? John Mikhail discusses this question with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. Philosophy Bites is made in association with the Institute of Philosophy.

Direct download: John_Mikhail_on_Battery_and_Morality.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:28am EDT

Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan, published in 1651, remains one of the great works of political philosophy. Noel Malcolm has recently published a 3 volume scholarly edition of this book, based on decades of research. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses how a better understanding of the context in which Hobbes was writing can lead to new insights. Philosophy Bites is made in association with the Institute of Philosophy.

Direct download: Noel_Malcolm_on_Hobbes_Leviathan_in_Context.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:10pm EDT



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